Fine Lines

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SF Mullet progress. I’m working on border design currently. Graphic design has never been my strong point, so I am really pushing myself in this project to create a full composition that considers layout, framing of the subject, and cohesion for a series as well as the content itself. This is also improving my skills in Illustrator.
I plan to create several illustrations in this vein for this particular series. Once this illustration is complete, I’ll post a breakdown of techniques and tips that went into this piece.

SF Mullet progress. I’m working on border design currently. Graphic design has never been my strong point, so I am really pushing myself in this project to create a full composition that considers layout, framing of the subject, and cohesion for a series as well as the content itself. This is also improving my skills in Illustrator.

I plan to create several illustrations in this vein for this particular series. Once this illustration is complete, I’ll post a breakdown of techniques and tips that went into this piece.

Jan 3

A pet project of mine over the past two days. It started as a fun sketch teasing the style of building in San Francisco, which I have named “The San Francisco Mullet.” The first five images are sketches drawn with my tablet in Photoshop, moving layers around to design the two halves and how they connect on the side while creating a production image.Then I played around in Illustrator using Livetrace, fills, and gradients until I arrived at the final image. I’ve still got a long way to go, but the setup is here. Next will be taking another look at my color palette and deciding on titles and borders. I want everything to stay in a similar style graphically, and that may mean hand drawing the titles. More to come in the future.

Massing sketches for the Austin New Music Center. I was researching a lot of Steven Holl’s watercolors during this semester. However, to work faster, and produce the bookful of sketches for this design, I worked in pencil, colored pencil, and marker.

Composite elevations and sections of Austin New Music Center project.

Elevation Rendering: Export line drawings with and without shadows. Overlay in photoshop. Tile hand drawn brick and wood textures. Overlay into photoshop file. Color surfaces with gradient tool. Overlay butter trace layer on color burn filter. Grab only vegetation forms, and delete the rest of the butter trace layer.

Section Rendering. Export line drawings with and without shadows. Overlay in photoshop.

I’ve found that elevations look best fully rendered with color, and sections look better in black and white with shadows. Must keep poche clearly visible.

A conceptual sketch created entirely in Photoshop. Began by manipulating the existing image until I found a form I liked, then used paintbrush under various filters to create the texture effect, cleaned up with polygonal lasso tool, and kept going. The design process felt so natural, and the image was presentation quality instantly. 
For the Austin New Music Center studio project in my seventh semester, year 2011.

A conceptual sketch created entirely in Photoshop. Began by manipulating the existing image until I found a form I liked, then used paintbrush under various filters to create the texture effect, cleaned up with polygonal lasso tool, and kept going. The design process felt so natural, and the image was presentation quality instantly. 

For the Austin New Music Center studio project in my seventh semester, year 2011.

Dec 4
Interior of a Tower. Design for a mausoleum for my firm. The main building is a hallway of crypts on one side, and windows out to the lake on the other. The tower marks a corner of the building as an alternative entrance, where you come in off-center of the main space, take in the height of the tower, and then after stepping out from under the lowered tower walls (nine feet above the floor), you find yourself on center with the rest of the space. The space under the tower was inspired by an interior of Alvaro Siza’s Gracia de Santa Maria San Marcos chapel in Portugal.
Hand sketch rendered in Photoshop. Took 45 minutes to render over the original sketch.

Interior of a Tower. Design for a mausoleum for my firm. The main building is a hallway of crypts on one side, and windows out to the lake on the other. The tower marks a corner of the building as an alternative entrance, where you come in off-center of the main space, take in the height of the tower, and then after stepping out from under the lowered tower walls (nine feet above the floor), you find yourself on center with the rest of the space. The space under the tower was inspired by an interior of Alvaro Siza’s Gracia de Santa Maria San Marcos chapel in Portugal.

Hand sketch rendered in Photoshop. Took 45 minutes to render over the original sketch.

Three maps of an northern portion of the river flowing through San Antonio, about a mile from the Riverwalk. The first an interpretation of the Noli maps, with an overlay of visibilities between existing nodes of use along the river. The second a line drawing diagram depicting connections and barriers for the nodes within the site and the surrounding boundaries of the site. The third proposes a new set of activity nodes, one that will more closely connect with the river and other nodes.

This was done in my fourth studio semester at UT, where we looked at Urban Planning.

Nov 7

The butter trace outline and final rendering of one of my market hutong renderings in Beijing. No I did not trace every single line in there. I exported a rendered view and a line-only view of this scene, printed the line, and scanned back in the line and tracework together. Sometimes you have to learn all the slow-moving technicalities of producing a drawing well, and sometimes you have to learn how to work smarter, not harder. (I am guilty of forgetting about the latter in my personal drawings)

The final details came through at nearly the last minute, as is often the case in studio and offices. If I were to return to these renderings, I would desaturate the trees some, actually give my figures shadows, differentiate a few of the brick colors, and then add an extra layer of information to populate the drawing. More stands in the street, seating, parkspace, infrastructure.

Nov 7

Some of my first *slightly* successful renderings over Revit renders. These were from a very quickly modeled mass of buildings around a city block in Beijing, China. I did not even have time to drop in windows into the model! For that and some of the more detailed elements, I traced over the massing on butter trace, scanned that in and overlaid the drawing as a “multiply” layer over the original rendering. The yellow bits are where I deleted the underlaid rendering entirely and let the yellow texture show through. Then I dropped in people and trees, adjusting the opacity as I went.

Nov 6
The fastest rendering I have ever done. I spent some time reviewing a previous project, cartooned out several possible new perspective views, and drew a basic outline of my chosen view. Then, I took this outline into photoshop and came out with a full render in thirty minutes, ready to print. I was flying through the project.

Tips for quick renders: gradients are your friend. The only thing that is not a gradient is a scan of butter trace which I put on (I believe) a “multiply filter for a grungy texture, and a collaged image from a photograph I’d taken on one of my travels. Always keep a log of textures and photos. You never know when they will be of use.

The fastest rendering I have ever done. I spent some time reviewing a previous project, cartooned out several possible new perspective views, and drew a basic outline of my chosen view. Then, I took this outline into photoshop and came out with a full render in thirty minutes, ready to print. I was flying through the project.

Tips for quick renders: gradients are your friend. The only thing that is not a gradient is a scan of butter trace which I put on (I believe) a “multiply filter for a grungy texture, and a collaged image from a photograph I’d taken on one of my travels. Always keep a log of textures and photos. You never know when they will be of use.